These 7 y/o’s Are Richer Than You

The reach of influencer content has sky-rocketed over the past decade, coinciding with the rise of social media. The accessibility of these platforms allow ordinary people to gain a huge following. The days where you have to act, play an instrument, or excel at a sport to become famous are now over. Now, merely commentating on pop culture, or reviewing your favourite face wash is sufficient.

There’s a much more controversial side to this influencer trade, though: Kid Influencers

Take YouTube ‘Kidfluencer’ Ryan ToysReview for example, with 18.7 million subscribers on social platform, YouTube. Forbes estimated that the 7-year-old makes US$11 million per year, just for reviewing toys. A video that was published merely 16 hours has already gained 2.1 million views!

Source: youtube.com

The main problem seen with ‘Kidfluencers’ is to do with their target audience. In an era where it seems most children have an iPad, kids may not be able to distinguish between sponsored and non-sponsored content. The International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) recently updated their “Advertising and Marketing Communications Code”, Article 18 reading; “Marketing communications directed to children should be clearly distinguishable to them as such”. This denoting that advertised content directed towards children must be made clear. 

The ICC Marketing Code around the world
Source: https://iccwbo.org

It is the rise of socials platforms, particularly YouTube and Instagram, that allow people to build an empire at no cost. Platforms such as these operate through advertising models that offer users a free experience. 

Privacy is a virtue for these kids, with much of their lives published online. Their day-to-day activities being recorded… from their home. What age can a child fully consent to being an online personality (which are usually the wishes of their parents)?

Look, maybe I’m just jealous that these under 10’s earn more than I ever will, but these kids surely don’t understand the extent of what they’re doing, or the impact it’ll have on other people.

What’s your view? Should their be more restrictions on who can market and who can be marketed to?

26 thoughts on “These 7 y/o’s Are Richer Than You

  1. great post! looking forward for more posts! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is a very intriguing read! I think some regulation might be a step in the right way forward, as children most likely don’t fully comprehend how what they post online can never be truly deleted.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s a good point, whatever they post now will essentially be online forever. Thanks for reading!

      Like

  3. Great post! It’s crazy how many children actually have their own Youtube channels these days, and the ethics involved in that are certainly questionable. Thanks for the interesting read!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much for reading! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Their parents decide what will be sent to the public platform, and sometimes the child’s personal privacy is completely controlled by the parents. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for reading, Anthony! 🙂

      Like

  5. Great read and very interesting article. I never really thought that parents could make money off their kids and at the same time allowing them to enjoy toys and such. I hope to read more from you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for reading, Justin! 🙂

      Like

  6. You raise some really interesting points. I think there is so much good that comes from having the freedom that social media give us but I also think that we need to be mindful of how it may be effecting us, particularly younger more impressionable people.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You make a great point Sophie! Maybe simply more awareness is needed as opposed to stricter regulation. Thanks for reading!

      Like

  7. Its crazy how these kids earn so much at that age!!! This is a really interesting read 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It shocks me as well! Thanks for reading 🙂

      Like

  8. Wow I had no idea kid YouTube channels were so popular and earning that kind of cash! I think it’s extremely important to make sure that kids understand what sponsored content is. But I also realise it’s extremely difficult to do so on a platform such as YouTube.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely! Thanks so much for reading, Sheri! 🙂

      Like

  9. Great read! I definitely think restrictions are needed because other than Youtube, parents are also making their kids as ‘models’ and ‘tv stars’ without them comprehending the full consequence they will later face in the future.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly! It’s truly terrifying to me that kids can be exploited (in my personal view) in those kind of ways. Thanks for reading, Elaine! 🙂

      Like

  10. Super interesting post! I partially agree that maybe target markets should be monitored but then again, how different is a kid talking about a product on youtube to an ad aimed at kids? Where do you draw the line? They will still want the product in each situation, right?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much for reading, Amelia!

      Like

  11. I find social media and technology evolvement so scary for younger generations, these days 3 year olds have iPads and some parents dont even monitor their use! Thanks for the read!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly! It’s a scary new age. Thanks for reading!

      Like

  12. Hi Indiana, A great post! I’m not sure how I feel about this yet. You would hope that at least it is creating financial security for the kids’ futures. Where might this go in the future, do you see large companies jumping on board this wagon?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A really great point, Eugene! I just hope that these parents aren’t treating themselves to a new Ferrari or two at the expense of their kids’ fortune! Due to the sheer reach of these kidfluencers, I think large companies would absolutely jump on board this wagon!

      Like

  13. I think the debate here is very interesting. It’s often said that at the end of the day parents are making the purchase and therefore the onus lies on them to make good decisions however people can often underestimate how effectively these children can be manipulated by brands into believing they need something and the pressure they then put on their parents. Definitely needs to see an increase in regulation.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for your input, Elena. Stricter regulation would definitely help such ethical issues with kid influencers and the audience they market towards. After all, both these kid consumers AND kid influencers themselves should be protected.

      Like

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